Volume 8, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 42-46
Selection and Performance Evaluation of Local Honeybee (Apis mellifera bandasii) for Stock Improvement in Ethiopia
Taye Negera, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Holeta Bee Research Center, Holeta, Ethiopia
Zewudu Ararso, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Holeta Bee Research Center, Holeta, Ethiopia
Kibebew Wakjira, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Holeta Bee Research Center, Holeta, Ethiopia
Received: Jun. 24, 2020;       Accepted: Aug. 6, 2020;       Published: Aug. 13, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.abb.20200803.11      View  77      Downloads  23
Abstract
Human management and selective breeding are believed to improve many economically important strains of a given honeybee population to benefit the beekeepers. Selective breeding is supposed to be a promising way to estimate value of stock improvement elsewhere, though it is not a common practice in our local honeybees. Thus, to evaluate, select and maintain the best performing stock of local honeybee colonies based on different performance parameters, we obtained 120 honeybee colonies of Apis mellifera bandasii from local beekeepers within traditional hives and transferred into movable frame hive at two apiaries. All the transferred colonies were managed properly to establish themselves and acquire uniform strength. At each of the two sites 50 colonies with similar resources (brood, nectar and pollen) and colony strengths were selected and maintained under continues follow-ups for data collections. The colonies were evaluated for different parameters such as brood development, brood solidness, hygienic behavior and honey yield. The results of the study indicated that honeybee colonies after selection showed significant differences in brood solidness, hygienic behaviors and honey yield compared to honeybee’s population before selection. This study revealed a 42% increment in honey yield only due to selecting and rearing of queens from the best performing lines. Moreover, brood quality (solidness) and hygienic behavior of local honeybee colonies were significantly improved from 86.6 to 94.3% and 86.0% to 91.2% due to selection. From this practical point of view, it is possible to conclude that there is a possibility of improving the production performance of native stock through selection and breeding of maternal lines.
Keywords
Apis mellifera bandasii, Honeybee, Brood Rearing, Hygienic Behavior, Stock Improvement
To cite this article
Taye Negera, Zewudu Ararso, Kibebew Wakjira, Selection and Performance Evaluation of Local Honeybee (Apis mellifera bandasii) for Stock Improvement in Ethiopia, Advances in Bioscience and Bioengineering. Vol. 8, No. 3, 2020, pp. 42-46. doi: 10.11648/j.abb.20200803.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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