Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2019, Page: 27-31
Microbiological Analysis of Top Soil and Rhizosphere Treated with Organic Manure
Aniefon Alphonsus Ibuot, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Iniobong Ime James, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Mayen Godwin Ben, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Christiana Utibe Etuk, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Agnes Monday Jones, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Emmanuel Anthony Umoren, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Elizabeth Lazarus Akpan, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Esther Ndarake Akpan, Department of Science Technology, Akwa Ibom State Polytechnic, Ikot Osurua, Ikot Ekpene, Nigeria
Received: Jun. 6, 2019;       Accepted: Jul. 12, 2019;       Published: Jul. 26, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.abb.20190702.13      View  141      Downloads  19
Abstract
Microbiological analysis of topsoil and rhizosphere treated with organic manure (Poultry droppings) was carried out. Soil samples were analyzed at three days interval (Day 1, Day 4, Day 7 and Day 10). The total bacterial count recorded for rhizosphere soil treated with poultry droppings (RS:P) had the highest bacterial count ranging between 2.1×106 and 5.7×106 CFU/g. Top soil treated with poultry droppings had total bacterial count ranging between 1.9×106 and 4.9×106 CFU/g. The controls (untreated rhizosphere soil) had a total bacterial count ranging between 2.6×106 and 4.0×106 CFU/g and untreated topsoil had bacterial count ranging between 1.4×106 and 2.4×106 CFU/g. Total fungal count for top soil treated with poultry droppings ranged between 0.2×106 and 0.9×106 CFU/g. Total fungal count for rhizosphere soil treated with poultry droppings ranged between 0.2×106 and 0.3×106 CFU/g. Untreated top soil had total fungal count ranging between 0.1×106 and 0.2×106 CFU/g while untreated rhizosphere soil had a total fungal count ranging between 0.1×106 and 0.2×106 CFU/g. Bacterial isolates identified with their percentage frequency of occurrence were Bacillus sp (16.8), Enterococus sp (8.4), Clostridium sp (4.0), Staphylococcus sp (8.0) Pseudomonas sp (15.6), Listeria sp (12.0), Micrococcus sp (14.0), Serratia sp (4.8) and Streptococcus sp (7.2). Fungal isolates identified with their percentage frequency of occurrence were Rhizosphere sp (26.7%), Penicillium sp (22.5%), Aspergillus sp (21.1%), Mucor sp (19.7%) and lastly Cladosporium sp (9.8%). Metabolites secreted by the root system act as chemical signal attracting high population of microorganisms. The application of organic manure to the soil enhanced the microbial population of the soil, hence the need to apply organic manure to soil to enhance agricultural sustainably.
Keywords
Soil, Microorganisms, Rhizosphere, Organic Manure
To cite this article
Aniefon Alphonsus Ibuot, Iniobong Ime James, Mayen Godwin Ben, Christiana Utibe Etuk, Agnes Monday Jones, Emmanuel Anthony Umoren, Elizabeth Lazarus Akpan, Esther Ndarake Akpan, Microbiological Analysis of Top Soil and Rhizosphere Treated with Organic Manure, Advances in Bioscience and Bioengineering. Vol. 7, No. 2, 2019, pp. 27-31. doi: 10.11648/j.abb.20190702.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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